SEO Content appears the first in source code and on the very bottom of page. Its placement depends on Module.

1. Edit it in CMS "SEO Content" Content Area on normal CMS pages.

2. E-commerce categories have it in "SEO ("SEO Content")" section.

3. E-commerce Product is editable in "SEO Data (Content)" section.

There is default one that is in /styles/master1/c/ folder. If you want to replace it, just upload image with "caption-sub.jpg" name to the folder. Size should be 1920 x 320 pixels (6:1)

You can use Caption Image field in CMS to replace it on specific pages.

Or upload Category Image on category pages.

1. CMS - "Header" field

2. Ecommerce Category - category name

3. Ecommerce Product - product name

4. Blog list - blog name

5. Blog post - post name

6. News/Events item - news/events name

Subtitle

Blog and News/Events module also contain subtitle that is pushed automatically from modules

Beating cancer and living your life

Kristina Baum 

I believe they way we beat cancer is through living our life.

In my 36 years of life, I've had cancer, not once but twice. The first time I was diagnosed with stage 3a malignant melanoma (skin cancer) and the second time malignant melanoma at stage 4. There is no stage 5.  There is no cure. The survival rate was extremely low. If unresponsive to treatment, I would have about a year to live.  When I was diagnosed a second time, my oncology team at Johns Hopkins Hospital offered me a spot on a phase one clinical trial (non-FDA approved). Basically, I was kind of a human guinea pig.  I had a handful of toxic side effects including one that was near fatal. I began to really think maybe I was dying and no one was telling me in fear of hurting my feelings. I would wonder if I was going to outlive the shampoo in my shampoo bottle.

I gave the clinical trial a shot and by God's grace it worked!  The cancer slowly started shrinking and was GONE within a year....but I still had a long road ahead of me. When I completed treatment, I had been on prednisone for about four months.  Prednisone is a cortico steroid designed to calm inflammation in your body and likewise it also destroys muscle mass.  This left me incredibly weak.  Stairs were a challenge.  I could barely hold my arms above my head to wash my hair at night.  I would shave my legs and blood would be everywhere. I couldn't even run a 0.25 of a mile. I couldn't do one push-up. It was a struggle. I did the same strength workouts over and over and over and over again until I could at least do one halfway. I refused to give up. Cancer had stolen so many pieces of my life and now it was time for me to take it back.I wanted to be strong again.  I had had enough of feeling weak.  

I started small at first. I began running 5ks every weekend for a while.  Just something to get me up and outside running again. I ran in high school and did some races in 2005/2006 so it was more simple to start with what was familiar. Then I signed up for my very first sprint triathlon with a friend.  I trained hard and really didn't know what I was doing.

 I signed up for a Masters Swim class and learned how to really swim (up until then, I'd only recreationally swam at the beach). I bought a road bike from a local triathlon shop. The week up to the triathlon it looked like it was going to be cold so I bought a full wetsuit.  True story: I was so cold and worried that I wouldn't get the wetsuit off so I did the whole sprint triathlon in the wetsuit!  (I don't recommend ever trying that, ha!)  But it was a start.  It took a lot of courage to simply just start.  I didn't know anything about the triathlon community.  Would I be laughed at?  How fast was everyone?  Is it obvious I'm a beginner?  

My very first race I racked my bike next to a woman who had done multiple Ironmans and she was so kind.  That's when I realized how welcoming the triathlon comunity really is. That helped. A lot.

This past Sunday, I ran my very first full marathon. I dedicated a mile to each person who has either had cancer, currently fighting cancer, lost a battle to cancer, or an immediate family member impacted by cancer.  I wanted to remind myself that these folks are not giving up - and I was not going to give up either. 

As I wound around the corners of the race, I recalled beeping machines from nights in the hospital, blood tubes and needles coming from my right arm, countless MRIs and CT Scans, and the words from my oncologist telling me that he was going to do everything he could to save me.  Now, I get to keep beating cancer with my life.  It's what I go back to when workouts get hard. 

Life is worth it and you have to believe you're worth it too. 

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